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The change of constitution in 2010 marked the onset of political changes in Kenya. Effectively Jomo Kenyatta and Daniel Moi’s imperial presidency was halted. Powers of the president were significantly reduced and more power given to the people through devolution and the bill of rights. The following report highlights the impact of a change of guard in Kenya’s political arena.

 

Since Kenya independence those who have had   a shot at the presidency ruled differently. During retired president Moi’s era and Jomo Kenyatta’s regime the two had veto powers and their word was final.

No constitutional bodies could over turn their decision or even attempt to question their stand.

More than a decade ago, the nature of the presidency was that of exercising power through authority unlike the current era that requires influence to gain power…

 

The political transition started in the Kibaki regime who had to come to terms with the might of the constitution…

On December 30, 2002, Mwai Kibaki, was wheeled into the dais at Nairobi’s Uhuru Park, to a frenzied crowd that had come to witness the swearing in of Kenya’s third President

 

Mwai Kibaki had inherited a tattered economy and a corrupt system. He promised to reverse the declining school enrollment, facilitate citizens to have access to basic and affordable health services and rehabilitate the dilapidated roads and other infrastructures.

With more power in the hands of the mwananchi President Kibaki for instance, could not single handedly appoint a preferred list of nominees to office…

 

In the old dispensation nepotism was on an all-time high…pprevious presidents could issue any order they wanted and it would come to pass…

 

With devolution now in place, a better part of Kenya’s revenue trickles down to the grassroots unlike in the past where resources revolved around the president and his cabinet…the all powerful

 

With regards to separation of power, now cabinet secretaries can be appointed outside the national assembly and the senate.

 

An indication of the independence of the legislature and the executive as arms of government.

 

The constitution of Kenya has got the Uhuru Kenyatta presidency push for the 2 thirds gender rule although that is yet to pass

 

Though not fully implemented, Gender and Equality groups report that a significant change has been effected in various nomination and elective posts…

Today, more women are in politics together with person with disabilities…

We saw in the August 8th general elections 3 women governors, Joyce Laboso, Charity Ngilu and Anne Waiguru won fair and square…something highly unlikely in the past eras…

 

The Judiciary is also more independent and progressive in its rulings…

 

The most recent and history making remains the invalidation of a presidential win…Uhuru Kenyatta’s.

 

The forth in the world…Kenya’s presidential election being nullified shows how of age democracy in Kenya have become.

 

Power is vested in the independent constitutional bodies such as the Judiciary and not the presidency.

 

However, the executive control of parliament, analysts say, could reinstall dictatorship if members of the majority constantly pass repressive bills.

 

Again as much as the constitution was meant to eradicate corruption, the bad disease in its own capacity becomes devolved corruption…

 

The question therefore remains, is it a vicious cycle? History repeating itself and Kenya’s democracy still being a farfetched dream?

 

 

 

 

 

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